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dscn6999[1]

branches in the blue hills

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https://www.mass.gov/locations/blue-hills-reservation

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belle isle in ice

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It may not have been the smartest move, to visit a favorite salt marsh when the windchill is below zero, but sometimes it’s about forward momentum, to keep moving, and that’s what we did this morning while the light was bright. We didn’t last long on the trail, but it was enough.

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One thing that was hard to capture was how everything, every grass, branch, dried leaf, was encased in ice and they glowed in the sun, but it was too cold (for me) to stand still and frame the “perfect” shot, and my partner in crime kept telling me “we only have so many reserves of heat.” He had a destination … to the end of a particularly popular viewing area. We made it there but it was the least protected of areas and the wind hit, and we had a moment of “Go team!” before the race/skate back to the car.

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And on that race/skate back to the car I saw something wonderful. Finches, cardinals, doves and other birds I can’t name, feeding at the station that had been set up. Under different circumstances, with different preparation, I could have planted my feet and photographed all of their color and variation. But given my numb fingers, I figured enough was enough and I looked forward to future opportunities.

a window

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somerville sunset

dscn6766[1]

a new year … new colors

pastel window trim

I’m not sure I quite get Pantone’s “living coral” as Color of the Year but it did engage my brain … like the visual equivalent of a writing prompt … to seek out where that color might already be around me. I haven’t found it (yet) but I did chance upon a photo of decorative glass composed of other lovely pastel shades. And as I stared at that photo I began to imagine what might happen if I continue this new year with my interpretation and expression of John La Farge’s idea of “construction by color.” As you can see in the following slide show, you never know what might happen when you take colors, turn them on their sides, weave them together, shrink and repeat them … and so on and so forth until glass is translated into fabric.

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The scarf, 36 x 36, will soon be available exclusively at the shop at Trinity Church. You can follow the shop facebook page and instagram account to stay on top of this and other items I’m honored to have appear on the shelves.