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Simply beautiful …

imagesandwordsbylorraine

small white butterfly on colorful flower….IMG_0317

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The heat is making me and my little tabletop garden a bit droopy. But we’re hanging in there. Unruly or not, it’s nice to see that spot of green next to the window. Next major gardening goal is to plant the nasturtium seeds that my cousin gave me. I’ve got the dirt now I just have to find the gumption … which will most likely happen after the temperature falls tomorrow. 🙂

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It was very heartening for me to learn of the creation of the SNCC Digital Gateway (snccdigital.org), a multimedia website and repository created jointly by the SNCC Legacy Project, Duke University’s Center for Documentary Studies, and the Duke University Libraries. The site shares the stories of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a student-led, southern-based, civil rights group founded in 1960 at Shaw University. They provided strategic leadership on the ground mobilizing people of all ages and races in the face of violence and threat of death. One of the SNCC staff members profiled is Fannie Lou Hamer. Please do read her full profile (link below) but I will share this excerpt which moved me deeply.

“Whether calming people with her singing or speaking truth to power, Mrs. Hamer’s voice could not be ignored. … Mrs. Hamer did not shy away from the dangers of challenging segregation and the denial of voting rights in Mississippi. “I’m gonna be standing up, I’m gonna be moving forward, and if they shoot me, I’m not going to fall back, I’m going to fall 5 feet 4 inches forward.”

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Fannie Lou Hamer 1917-1977

P.S. If you’re looking for further inspiration about the power of resistance in the face of tyranny, please revisit the excellent documentary, Freedom Riders, which aired on PBS in 2011.

Source

https://snccdigital.org/

http://dukemagazine.duke.edu/article/a-gateway-to-the-wisdom-of-civil-rights-activists

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fannie_Lou_Hamer

https://snccdigital.org/people/fannie-lou-hamer/

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I couldn’t help myself. Despite how I ended the previous post, I had to dig just a little deeper and this is what I found.

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In 1902 this was the archway over the altar in Faith United Parish, then known as the Calvinistic Congregation Church. In 1904 that archway was altered to incorporate a memorial to the parents of Daniel Simonds. Simonds was the son of Abel and Jane Todd Simonds. Abel Simonds was the founder of the Simonds Manufacturing Company, a company operating and still headquartered in Fitchburg. Son Daniel was an astute businessman who led the company’s growth internationally. With his great wealth, he invested heavily in his hometown of Fitchburg and in the good works of his church.

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In the April 16, 1904 issue of The Congregationalist and Christian World, Volume 89, there is a note in the Record of the Week section stating that at the Fitchburg Calvinistic Congregation Church “Choir arch redecorated and its center supplied with windows of beautiful design, the whole a gift of Daniel Simonds, in memory of his parents. They were dedicated Easter Sunday.” Unfortunately no artist or studio is named in the article.

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As for mystery #2 …

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Based on information gleaned from Fitchburg Sentinel newspapers from 1930, it appears that the window, named The Resurrection, was a gift to the church by Mrs. Daniel Simonds, born Ellen Gifford.

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Again, no clues as to studio or artist at this time. But who knows what might be revealed one day. 🙂

 

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Words + Images

While traveling in Sumter, South Carolina it was my pleasure to visit the Temple Sinai, founded as a Reform Jewish Congregation. The history of Sumter’s Jewish community dates back to 1815. The first Jews who settled in Sumter were Sephardic and came from Charleston, SC. The current congregation was formed in 1895 by the merger of the Hebrew Cemetery Society and the Sumter Hebrew Benevolent Society. Construction of the congregration’s present temple was begun in 1912 and completed in 1913.

A feature article in the March 1913 Sumter newspaper The Watchman and Southron notes “The Temple is situated on the corner of Church street and Hampton avenue and is an imposing structure of red brick with domed roof … The architectural lines are simple, but the proportions are so good and so well harmonized that the general impression is one of beauty, allied to strength and permanence. As impressive…

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Each morning begins with a heavy sigh after reading the headlines but then as I peer out the various windows I find peace in my little garden of sprouts and herbs and so forth growing wherever they can catch the light.

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