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Posts Tagged ‘Inspiration’

While puttering around the kitchen this morning I suddenly yearned for a particular cup of tea. I could see it clearly, could almost smell it. But instead of Lipton tea with sugar and a long pour of Pet’s evaporated milk, I made myself some chai. I smiled at the memory though. Lipton’s was my mother’s tea. Really, the family’s tea. She never added anything except a bit of sugar but my brothers would empty the can of milk and the sugar bowl. Awhile back I noted my oldest brother’s grandson doing the same. I happened to be sitting by my brother at the time. I looked at him and with a raised eyebrow asked, “Well, I wonder where he learned that from?”

Yellow onions were a fixture in our home too. I’ve not cooked with them probably in 15 plus years having made a gustatory switch to red onions. But while walking through the grocery store earlier this month the yellow onions caught my attention. I was compelled to pick up one. Slicing through that first yellow onion brought tears to my eyes with its wonderfully pungent scent. A forgotten scent remembered. As I washed my hands before I accidentally rubbed my eyes I remembered how my father used to cry as he cut these same onions. It was a task that my mom often had him do. Now I know why. But I can’t help myself. Every time I cut one I now raise the half to my nose and inhale deep. I don’t feel compelled to eat them raw, as I must have as a child, and as I remember my father doing all the time. There is something simply serene in slow cooking with the onion, sauteing it in butter, or slicing it up for roasting vegetables. There is an upwelling of familiarity and home even in a different time and place and home.

There are other foods, flavors, scents from childhood that are “upwelling” this month. They come unbidden and they are welcome and so far they have always brought a smile.

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Holy Family Sculpture by Steve Rose of Boston Ice Effects

It was cold in Copley Square yesterday but well worth the layering, hand warmers jammed into pockets, etc to watch the action as this depiction of the Holy Family emerged from blocks of ice. Weather permitting you should be able to view this life-sized outdoor sculpture between 4:30 and 7:30 daily into the New Year. Located on the Boylston Street side of Trinity Church near the statue of Phillips Brooks.

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simply a big beautiful tree that towers over his house

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Trinity Church in Copley Square. Boston

Well, I can tell you, with a little behind the scenes knowledge, that the only things missing from this view of Trinity Church are the four large wreaths that will hang from the columns of the church’s now brightly lit west porch and a life-size ice scene of the nativity sculpted by local artist Steve Rose of Boston Ice Effects. The sculpture will be located near the Phillips Brooks statue on the Boylston Street side of the church and will also be illuminated. This decoration is just one part of the church’s reimagining its traditional Candlelight Carols. Festivities begin this Saturday December 19th including the launch of Trinity’s first ever “Christmas Peek.”

The church’s Copley Square doors will then be open for visitors to step into a glassed alcove for a glimpse of a festive tableau. Featuring a grove of Christmas trees decorated with lights, stars, and parishioners’ ornaments, and Trinity’s worship space decked with greenery, poinsettias, and crèche, the experience will be joyfully accented with the sights and sounds of Candlelight Carols playing on large screens and airing through speakers facing the Square. The Christmas Peek will then remain open from 4:30-7:30 p.m. on most evenings (including Christmas Eve) through the Feast of the Epiphany on January 6. With safety and wellness a presiding concern, the program will abide the state’s COVID-19 protocols.

Via the following link you can find out more details about the launch and how you can participate in person or virtually. https://www.trinitychurchboston.org/event/opening-night-of-candlelight-carols

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ice

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at the very top of a tree

a tiny bird

its feathers lit from below

by the setting sun.

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I’m thinking I have some learning to do about bringing outdoor herbs indoors for the winter. Some little creatures might come along for the ride. 🙂

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The sun was shining bright in Copley Square yesterday. There is some lovely minimalist holiday decoration in the pond.

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It was simply and strangely beautiful. Walking through a world-class museum. There should have been chaotic hustle and bustle, the sounds of school children, teens taking selfies, seniors dressed to the nines meeting up for tea. Instead my friends and I were part of a very small cohort of people with tickets to see the Monet exhibit at the Boston Museum of Fine Art until we we were ready to leave and create space for others to enter. It was a special treat. Even as social distancing has become a new norm of the moment in the age of COVID, there have also been created these weirdly intimate opportunities to experience the world.

I expect that this exhibit of 35 Monet and other paintings would have been curated quite differently pre-pandemic. The current curation is expansive. There’s lots of space between paintings, and you’re moved through several large rooms that provide just enough information about his life, his influences, the growth of his garden, and the creation of that magnificent pond.

We are reminded of Monet’s triumphs. He was an acknowledged success during his life time. But we are also reminded of his humanity as we learn of his struggles to achieve his artistic vision … struggles that in the end produced great beauty.

An excellent exhibit and one I hope others have an opportunity to view in person. But if you can’t visit there is a lovely preview video on the MFA’s website, a slide show, behind the scenes with the curator and much more. See link below.

https://www.mfa.org/exhibition/monet-and-boston-lasting-impression

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