Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘painting’

LayeredCoasterCeiling

It is a new year and one of the things I intend to do is continue to tap into my inner child and play with shapes and colors. These images, produced with GIMP, begin with a tiny detail from the beautifully painted ceiling inside Trinity Church Boston.

layeredceilingsquare5

Read Full Post »

One year ago it was my pleasure to share, in his own words and images, a glimpse into the life of painter Donald Langosy. Through his 14-page Story of My Art, that I condensed into roughly six blog posts, Mr. Langosy shared his amazing creative journey that involved the likes of Ezra Pound, William Blake, his wife Elizabeth and of course there is Shakespeare. His work is unique and quite inspiring as can be seen in the new book Donald Langosy: The Poet’s Painter. This book of 99 poems by Eric Sigler illustrated with full-color reproductions of the 99 paintings by Mr. Langosy that inspired the poet.

IMG_20171211_085619769

Available online from a variety of vendors as listed below. If I have one criticism, after having seen firsthand the scale of some of these paintings, it is that I wish the book was physically bigger. Meanwhile I hope there will be an art opening one day so that more people can view his work up close and meet both painter and poet!

https://eyewearpublishing.glopal.com/en-US/p-8574461128/donald-langosy-poets-painter.html

 

Read Full Post »

IMG_20171105_123053925

To see the painting of the girl and her dog up close, a painting rather different than so many of Gainsborough’s other portraits … very moving.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Gainsborough

 

Read Full Post »

DSCN8599

Detail from The Startled Bird (1961) by painter Norah McGuinness on view in Dublin at the National Gallery of Ireland. Many beautiful works in the building but the colors and textures of this painting especially caught my eyes.

IMG_20171105_112957171

Read Full Post »

Madonna of the Harpies TCB

The original Madonna of the Harpies (1517) currently resides in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. It was painted by Andrea del Sarto (1486 – 1530) during the High Renaissance. This likely 19th century reproduction, artist unknown, resides in the hallway of a local church. Like similar paintings I’ve found in churches as I photograph their stained glass windows, the history of their paintings, tucked oftentimes in out of the way places, has faded over time. The how and the why of their existence is hard to discern without deeper research. And then in the end, as I have been reminded, one must keep in mind that during the late 19th century as wealthy Americans made grand tours of Italy there was a great demand for reproductions of Renaissance art (assuming one couldn’t buy the art outright).

Andredelsartoselfportrait

Andrea del Sarto self-portrait

Andrea del Sarto was a contemporary of Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo and Raphael. This painting is considered to be one of his finest works. Much has been written about this painting. I especially enjoyed reading David Franklin’s description of the artist’s creative process on page 136 of his book Painting in Renaissance Florence, 1500-1550.  I don’t know that I shall ever make it to Florence but it was a treat to learn of this powerful work of art by walking down a hallway.

800px-Andrea_del_Sarto_-_Madonna_delle_Arpie_-_Google_Art_Project

Madonna of the Harpies by Andrea del Sarto (1517)

Sources & Additional Reading

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna_of_the_Harpies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrea_del_Sarto

http://www.uffizi.com/painting-madonna-delle-arpie-uffizi-gallery.aspx

Read Full Post »

DSCN2314

I have read too many headlines this morning. My head is full of thoughts. I think I shall take a break from the computer screen until I can sort them. Meanwhile, I share these last images from my recent visit to the Boston Public Library’s Abbey Room and painter Edwin Austin Abbey’s expression of Tennyson’s Idylls of the King.

DSCN2311

Panel XIII. Sir Galahad crosses the sea in Solomon’s Ship

As for what’s happening in this scene, from the BPL website: “Sir Galahad crosses the seas to Sarras in Solomon’s Ship, guided by the Grail borne by an angel. Sir Bors and Sir Percival accompany him, while three spindles for the Tree of Life rest upon the stern of the ship.”

DSCN2316

https://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/sets/72157647672175522/with/15074561737/

Read Full Post »

DSCN2304

detail from The Arthurian Round Table and the fable of the Seat Perilous

Between 1893 and 1902 fifteen panels were installed in the Boston Public Library in Copley Square depicting the story of The Quest for the Holy Grail. Conceived of by artist Edwin Austin Abbey (1852-1911) he based his work on Lord Alfred Tennyson’s  version of the Arthurian legend. In recent years the BPL has done a magnificent job of capturing the beauty of the full panels and sharing each panel’s story with the public through Flikr. That link is below. When I walk in with my camera I tend to focus in on the details and this is what I recently saw.

DSCN2292

DSCN2295

detail from King Amfortas and the Castle of the Grail lie under a spell

DSCN2297

This time one of my favorite panels to focus on what the last in the sequence, The Golden Tree. According to the BPL summary, an adaptation from an outline by Henry James, “Sir Galahad, now the King of Sarras, builds a golden tree. When he is presented with the Grail, his spirit and the Grail ascend to heaven. Like other elements throughout the mural cycle, the golden tree and the Grail are depicted in gilded raised relief, a method that Abbey may have learned from his studio partner John Singer Sargent.”

DSCN2319

DSCN2322

DSCN2317

DSCN2323

DSCN2325

DSCN2332

Well worth a visit to see in person but until then you can see the full cycle of panels here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/sets/72157647672175522/with/15258034891/

And if you have a large cup of tea at hand, or something else, you can read Tennyson’s Holy Grail upon which the murals were based. They don’t write poems like this anymore. 🙂 http://d.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/text/tennyson-the-holy-grail

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »