Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘architecture’

DSCN8900

Installed between 1872 and 1957, the stained glass windows of First Church in Cambridge, Congregational “do not belong to a comprehensive scheme, nor to a single style, subject or studio. They are a melange. Each must be viewed in its own light.

DSCN8904

The Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

Those are the words of Pastor Allen Happe in the Foreword of the book, A Sympony of Color, by Patricia H. Rodgers. The book, published in 1990, provides a brief overview of the church’s 350 year history, and then focuses on the evolution of the physical building now present at 11 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA. It has been my pleasure to visit the building several times at night to attend concerts. Of course, I could not see the windows but  I was intrigued by their size and the lead outlines. Recently I made contact and was given permission to visit and photograph the windows. It was a cloudy day but there was just enough to light to illuminate the interior beauty.

DSCN8906

Detail from the Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

DSCN8907

Detail from the Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

DSCN8909

Detail from the Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

In her book, Rodgers identifies at least six studios whose work is represented including the Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company, The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc., Horace J. Phipps and Company, Reynolds, Francis and Rohnstock, Arthur Murray Dallin and Cummings Studios. There are several windows for which the studio is unknown. One of those windows is the Hart Window.

DSCN8945

Produced by an American glass company in 1901, it is composed of layers of opalescent glass. According to Rodger’s research, the windows was restored in 1987 and at that time it was discovered that there were up to three layers of glass in places.

DSCN8952

There are several striking windows by Tiffany Studios including St. Catherine of Alexander (1908). Catherine represents saintliness, beauty, and learning. This window, the last to be installed by Tiffany for First Church, was given in memory of young woman who was a noted scholar and dedicated to her missionary work.

DSCN8929

The Catherine window is situated between several non-figural grisaille windows.

DSCN8932

DSCN8926

There are at least eight Tiffany Studios windows present.

DSCN9011

Detail from They Shall Be Mine, Saith the Lord, 1895

Perhaps one of the most captivating windows overall is Tiffany’s The Four Elements, 1895.

DSCN8953

Designed by W. Frederick Wilson for the Tiffany Studio. As Rodgers notes in her book from a period newspaper, the window apparently has over one hundred thousand separate pieces of glass and one half tone of lead and solder used to hold the pieces in position. They are the largest set of windows at First Church.

DSCN8957

The robes of the largest angels, representing earth, air, fire and water, are made from drapery glass.

DSCN8959

DSCN8958

DSCN8971

DSCN8970

DSCN8968

Tiffany Studios closed around 1928. Windows installed after this time reflect a different aesthetic as in the Bancroft Window, 1929, produced by the studio of Reynolds, Francis and Rohnstock.

DSCN8991

DSCN8989

First Church in Cambridge, Congregational is quite the expansive space with a long history, and it is a welcoming place. I’m grateful for the opportunity to visit this lovely place and share the beauty of its windows.

DSCN8992

Learn more about this church online at http://www.firstchurchcambridge.org/

Sources & Additional Reading

https://www.amazon.com/symphony-color-Stained-glass-Church/dp/0962619604

DSCN8934

Detail from opalescent chancel window, Cummings Studios, 1954

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

DSCN9000

I recently visited First Church in Cambridge with my camera. Looking forward to sharing what I saw. Have a good Friday!

Read Full Post »

M4

… and so we walked into the Church of the Assumption Howth. Howth is a fishing village east of Dublin and easily accessible via DART, the public rail transportation system. We were walking, quite frankly trying to find another destination, when we noticed a church and though there did not immediately appear to be stained glass inside we took a chance and entered. Built in 1899, the church was designed by William H. Byrne. Not every church needs stained glass windows but it was a pleasant surprise to venture far enough inside to see the three apse windows dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

M2

The sequence begins with the angel Gabriel announcing to Mary that she is bear a son.

M3

The next features the Assumption of Mary into heaven, based on text from Revelation 12, her body and soul raised up to heaven.

M5

And finally Jesus placing the crown of Queen of Heaven on Mary’s head. She gazes down on humanity while angels keep watch from a sky full of stars.

DSCN8508

M7

A quick, lovely, unexpected visit. You can read more about the village of Howth here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howth

You can learn more about the church here: http://www.howthparish.ie/heritage

 

 

Read Full Post »

1

It’s actually the redesign of an “old” scarf based on a photograph of the chancel wall at Trinity Church Boston. This scarf is brighter with crisper detail where as the earlier version had more of a soft rosy hue due to light falling from an adjacent stained glass window.

2

If you’ve not seen it first hand, Trinity’s chancel is hand stenciled with beautiful floral and spiritual details. Its design and decoration is not original to the 140-year old building designed by H. H. Richardson. The original apse in 1877 was much more simple. It was redesigned in the 1930s by Maginnis and Walsh.

6

This silk scarf featuring the chancel decoration is available exclusively in the Trinity Church gift shop. You can learn more about the chancel on the Art and Architecture page of the Trinity Church website and of course on a tour.

5

Read Full Post »

1

detail from sermon on the mount, 1902

It was a quick visit but well worth it to see the interior of Arlington Street Church in Boston. The church has sixteen stained glass windows designed by Tiffany Studios of New York at the turn of the 20th century. Here are details from just a few.

4

detail from john the baptist, 1905

5

detail from jesus in the temple, 1903

6

detail from the good shepherd, 1900-1905

More pictures in the future. View for yourself generally between 10-3. Learn more online at http://www.ascboston.org/about/building.html

Read Full Post »

DSCN4363

Details from The Baptism, 1877, by Clayton & Bell, the first stained glass window in Trinity Church when it was consecrated in February 1877.

DSCN4365

DSCN4364

DSCN4357

BaptismDove2

See for yourself- trinitychurchboston.org/visit/tours

Read Full Post »

ResurrectionbyLaFarge1902

I’ve been lucky enough to have traveled to quite a few churches around the world, to glimpse just a bit of their sacred and secular beauty, and I have to say at this moment in my life, John La Farge’s The Resurrection (1902) for Trinity Church in the City of Boston is one that moves me most. It has been a pleasure to work collaboratively with colleagues there and with design companies to identify ways to translate, if only in a tiny way, such beauty in stained glass to items that people might like to take home or share with others.

shop3

I still love producing postcards and prints but I think this translation of the image onto a collectible oval glass ornament is especially striking given La Farge’s mastery of designing with the interplay of layered glass, paint and the effect of light always in mind. When you’re in the area, please see the window for yourself by visiting the church.  Learn more here: http://trinitychurchboston.org/visit/tours.  The oval ornament can be found in the church gift shop.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »