Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Tiffany’

DSCN2116

I’m a details oriented person for the most part, in fact so much so, that I know I sometimes miss the big picture. But by being details oriented it becomes easy to recognize things … in this case … As my companion and I walked around the perimeter of Saint Mark’s Episcopal Church I could see the outlines of the stained glass windows. I pointed. “That for sure is Tiffany Studios, and maybe that one, too.”  “You’re sure?” he asked. “Oh, yes,” I said with more confidence than I actually felt. “Look at the faces and the opalescent glass. The drapery. Signature Tiffany.”

DSCN2114

He took me for my word and began helping me tug on doors. A homeless man making himself comfortably in a shady corner waved us over and said, “You need to go to that door.” We thanked him. It was locked but eventually, as service was about to begin, an usher unlocked the door and let us in. He was very kind.

DSCN2117

As my companion talked with him about the organ, I snapped away trying not to disturb parishioners starting to settle in. And this is what I saw …

DSCN2121

DSCN2122

As for if and how many of the windows are actually Tiffany Studios, I don’t know for sure. That would involve a deeper level of research and conversation with the church historian or archivist.

DSCN2123

But just as fascinating would be to discover more about the windows that are decidedly modern looking in a style I’m not yet familiar with on the East Coast.

DSCN2132

DSCN2133

Sometimes reminiscent of Chagall for me. What do you think?

DSCN2134

DSCN2130

Anyway, mostly when I see glass of such different styles in a sacred space I am reminded that the building like the people can be dynamic. A lovely, quick visit … 🙂

DSCN2140

DSCN2127

https://stmarksberkeley.org/

Read Full Post »

DSCN1681

As noted on its website, the church currently known as Faith United Parish is home to a number of beautiful stained glass windows. Located on Main Street in the city of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, both the building and its congregation have evolved over time and continue to do so. Originally known in the 1800s as the Calvinistic Congregational Church, it merged with the First United Methodist Church in 1967, forming an urban cooperative ministry.

DSCN1603

The building, which was to be the third meeting house for this congregation, was designed in 1897 by architect and parishioner H. M. Francis who was influenced by the Romanesque Revival sparked by Henry Hobson Richardson with his creation of Trinity Church in the City of Boston. Standing outside the building on the corner of Main and Rollstone streets, one is immediately struck by the heavy stone facade, rounded arches, tall tower with its beautiful clock, and dark tracery of the interior stained glass windows.  Thanks to Pastor Jeff Conlon who allowed entry inside to see the windows firsthand.

DSCN1682

The rose window was designed by the Boston firm of Redding, Baird and Company. It measures twenty feet in diameter and its theme is the angelic choir.

rosewindow

The six angels are the spirits of Praise, with scroll; Love, holding the sacred dove, Music, blowing the trumpet, Music, playing the harp, Teaching, reading from the Book of Life, and the herald-angel of Easter morning.

DSCN1631

DSCN1632

DSCN1633

DSCN1638

DSCN1636

The description of the rose window is taken from the 1902 book, A History of the Calvinistic Congregational Church and Society, Fitchburg, Massachusetts. In 1902there were only two memorial stained glass windows in place, one given by Edward G. Bailey in memory of his mother Mrs. Rodney Wallace …

5

Dorcas

and the other given by George Hildreth in memory of his wife Pauline C. Hildreth.

hildreth2

These windows, plus three others added in 1903, are credited as Tiffany Studio windows designed by artist Frederick Wilson.

DSCN1655

While not widely known today, Frederick Wilson was a major ecclesiastical designer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was employed most notably by Tiffany for nearly thirty years and worked for other studios at the same time including Heaton, Butler and Bayne.

DSCN1656

Resurrection Angel

DSCN1611

Call of Matthew

DSCN1613

Call of Matthew

Two other figurative windows are present though not necessarily attributed to Tiffany or Wilson.

DSCN1666

While the above window does have similar opalescent and drapery glass as the Tiffany windows, the final window I photographed is strikingly different.

DSCN1645

A 1938 article in the Fitchburg Sentinel newspaper references this window, the Gifford Memorial window, as having been gifted to the church during the prior ten years. By the 1920s there was a distinct move away from the opalescence and designs that Tiffany and John La Farge had made famous. The use of rich colors and a reworking of the medieval inspired a new generation of artists. As for the name of this artist and his or her studio it is unclear without further research.

DSCN1648

While my focus tends to be stained glass, there were many other beautiful features to be seen inside as well as without, and I’m not the only one who thinks so. The building is considered one of the most important examples of Richardsonian architecture remaining. In 1979, the building was enrolled in the registry of National Historic Places. You can learn more about this important building and its church services via the following link. It was a great pleasure to visit.  http://www.faithunitedparish.com/index.htm

 

Sources & Additional Reading

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calvinistic_Congregational_Church

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_M._Francis

A History of the Calvinistic Congregational Church (1902)

Read Full Post »

DSCN1676

I took a field trip today to visit a church, one of many, in Fitchburg. Still sorting through photos. Will post more about this welcoming church and its lovely windows soon!

DSCN1670

DSCN1671

 

Read Full Post »

DSCN8900

Installed between 1872 and 1957, the stained glass windows of First Church in Cambridge, Congregational “do not belong to a comprehensive scheme, nor to a single style, subject or studio. They are a melange. Each must be viewed in its own light.

DSCN8904

The Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

Those are the words of Pastor Allen Happe in the Foreword of the book, A Sympony of Color, by Patricia H. Rodgers. The book, published in 1990, provides a brief overview of the church’s 350 year history, and then focuses on the evolution of the physical building now present at 11 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA. It has been my pleasure to visit the building several times at night to attend concerts. Of course, I could not see the windows but  I was intrigued by their size and the lead outlines. Recently I made contact and was given permission to visit and photograph the windows. It was a cloudy day but there was just enough to light to illuminate the interior beauty.

DSCN8906

Detail from the Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

DSCN8907

Detail from the Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

DSCN8909

Detail from the Kimball/Rice Window by Horace J. Phipps and Company (1918) and The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc. (1960)

In her book, Rodgers identifies at least six studios whose work is represented including the Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company, The Willet Stained Glass Studios, Inc., Horace J. Phipps and Company, Reynolds, Francis and Rohnstock, Arthur Murray Dallin and Cummings Studios. There are several windows for which the studio is unknown. One of those windows is the Hart Window.

DSCN8945

Produced by an American glass company in 1901, it is composed of layers of opalescent glass. According to Rodger’s research, the windows was restored in 1987 and at that time it was discovered that there were up to three layers of glass in places.

DSCN8952

There are several striking windows by Tiffany Studios including St. Catherine of Alexander (1908). Catherine represents saintliness, beauty, and learning. This window, the last to be installed by Tiffany for First Church, was given in memory of young woman who was a noted scholar and dedicated to her missionary work.

DSCN8929

The Catherine window is situated between several non-figural grisaille windows.

DSCN8932

DSCN8926

There are at least eight Tiffany Studios windows present.

DSCN9011

Detail from They Shall Be Mine, Saith the Lord, 1895

Perhaps one of the most captivating windows overall is Tiffany’s The Four Elements, 1895.

DSCN8953

Designed by W. Frederick Wilson for the Tiffany Studio. As Rodgers notes in her book from a period newspaper, the window apparently has over one hundred thousand separate pieces of glass and one half tone of lead and solder used to hold the pieces in position. They are the largest set of windows at First Church.

DSCN8957

The robes of the largest angels, representing earth, air, fire and water, are made from drapery glass.

DSCN8959

DSCN8958

DSCN8971

DSCN8970

DSCN8968

Tiffany Studios closed around 1928. Windows installed after this time reflect a different aesthetic as in the Bancroft Window, 1929, produced by the studio of Reynolds, Francis and Rohnstock.

DSCN8991

DSCN8989

First Church in Cambridge, Congregational is quite the expansive space with a long history, and it is a welcoming place. I’m grateful for the opportunity to visit this lovely place and share the beauty of its windows.

DSCN8992

Learn more about this church online at http://www.firstchurchcambridge.org/

Sources & Additional Reading

https://www.amazon.com/symphony-color-Stained-glass-Church/dp/0962619604

DSCN8934

Detail from opalescent chancel window, Cummings Studios, 1954

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

DSCN9000

I recently visited First Church in Cambridge with my camera. Looking forward to sharing what I saw. Have a good Friday!

Read Full Post »

detail from rice memorial window “christ the light of the world”

As you travel along Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge, just outside of Porter Square, you will find St. James’s Episcopal Church, a beautiful stone structure designed by Henry Martyn Congdon in a Richardsonian Romanesque style. While the church was founded in 1864, the cornerstone of the particular building in which I peered today was laid in 1888.  Inside is quite a variety of stained and painted glass (and a bell re-cast by Paul Revere!).

While I visited at the wrong time of day and time of year for the best effect, the opalescent windows along the west wall still caught my attention. I visited in early morning in spring but for the windows to be seen as their designers — John La Farge and possibly Tiffany — intended, I will need to visit again in winter in the late afternoon just before sunset.

detail from "jesus the good shepherd"by john la farge

detail from “jesus the good shepherd” by john la farge

I’ve already marked my calendar. 🙂

detail from the batchelder-dexter window, “the mission of the seventy”

I’m still sorting through pictures and their stories. More to come from my delightful visit. Meanwhile you can learn more about the church, its people and the history of the building here: http://www.stjames-cambridge.org/

Read Full Post »

watercolor study for purity, a stained glass window at trinity church in copley square

John La Farge and the Recovery of the Sacred is an exhibit at the McMullen Museum of Art at Boston College.  This free exhibit concludes December 13, 2015. I am most familiar with La Farge’s murals and stained glass windows at Trinity Church in Copley Square. Complex is a term often used to describe La Farge’s work, and I have a better understanding why after seeing this exhibit.

study for presentation of the virgin, a stained glass window at trinity church in copley square

It was a treat to see the range of his artistic talent expressed in pen and ink sketches, watercolors, oil paintings, wood block prints and of course in stained glass.

watercolor study by John La Farge

watercolor study by John La Farge

watercolor study for bishop hatto and the rats illustration

He may have been horrible at self-promotion, unlike his contemporary and supposedly one-time friend Louis Tiffany, but La Farge was certainly visionary when it came to manipulating light, colors and texture to capture particular moments, such as from his travels in Japan and the South Seas, and to tell stories both spiritual and secular.

tromple l’oeil curtain stained glass window by john la farge

Well worth a trip if you’re in the area. Further details can be found on the museum website: http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/artmuseum/visitor-information/index.html

Additional links

John La Farge and the Recovery of the Sacred Exhibit

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »