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Posts Tagged ‘creativity’

One image, a photograph of a window pane, then scaled and scaled again to create a whole new pattern.

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These are currently available at the gift shop located in the Welcome Center at Trinity Church in the City of Boston.

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While Mondrian came to mind once I stared at the image on the screen, it was in fact the 19th century glass decorator and stained glass designer Samuel West who inspired this work done in GIMP.

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It is a work in progress. Perhaps the first of a coaster set. Maybe the beginning of a larger design for a scarf. We’ll see. Meanwhile here’s a peek at the decorated window found inside Trinity Church that inspired this flight of creative fancy.

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http://trinitychurchboston.org/art-and-architecture

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You have only to do an online search for “street art” and “dublin” to discover the backstory as well as the ongoing evolution of graffiti arts in Dublin, Ireland. One of my favorite quick reads was this 2014 article: https://untappedcities.com/2014/02/24/the-evolution-of-dublins-street-art-scene/dublinstreetart2

Even on the cloudiest days, art brightens the city. I expect that one could orchestrate a whole tour of the city focused on street art and the artists who produce the very diverse works. It can be found up high …

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and down low …

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there’s the fun …

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and the poignant.

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There appeared to be few limits on presentation given this sculptural figure on a wall.

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More so than any other city I’ve been in, Dublin with its art everywhere made me want to put away my phone and to truly look around me. You never knew what you might see.

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It will take awhile for me to download all of the pictures taken during this road trip once more to Dublin, Ireland but one image that I do want to share is of these trees painted on the restaurant window of di luca wines & trattoria. A local artist works with the restaurant to change the window scene. After I am gone the window will become more winter themed though these white trees do remind me of winter. We were lucky enough to get a table at this restaurant. Food was great and the people, both staff and other diners, were wonderful. If you have chance, do visit: https://www.diluca.ie/

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To see the painting of the girl and her dog up close, a painting rather different than so many of Gainsborough’s other portraits … very moving.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Gainsborough

 

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The poem, Song of the Mad Prince, was part of Walter de la Mare’s collection Peacock Pie (1913). Clarke dresses his prince in an Elizabethan style as he stands before his mother and father. A variety of colors and tones are achieved by plating and etching of two planes of glass. It is a small piece actually with a custom case of walnut produced for a friend and patron of Clarke, Thomas Bodkin, who at one point was Director of the National Gallery of Ireland.

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Sources and Additional Reading

http://onlinecollection.nationalgallery.ie/objects/2389/the-song-of-the-mad-prince

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/song-of-the-mad-prince/

 

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I’ve long known of Harry Clarke and his illustrations and during previous trips to Dublin I learned of his work in stained glass, like at Bewley Cafe, but for this trip I was a bit by the seat of my pants and so I did not know there was some of his glass on exhibit at the National Gallery. And as we chanced upon his work, a docent for the museum led in a group and began to talk about why Clarke was so special in his use of layered glass for jeweled effect and his use of dark colors to direct the eyes of the viewer to the lighter glass to see what he wanted you to see. One window on view was the Mother of Sorrows, depicting the story of Mary holding the lifeless body of her son.

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According to an accompanying curatorial note, the window had been designed as a WWI memorial but instead became a memorial to Sister Superior Mary of Saint Winifred who had commissioned it.

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In addition to Mary holding Jesus, St. Francis stands to one side and St. Catherine on the other.

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And always angels looking on.

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The window is currently on view at the National Gallery. Entrance is free (though not all exhibits are free).

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Clarke

https://www.nationalgallery.ie/

 

 

 

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