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Posts Tagged ‘art’

oystershell

Shells are being strung,

trough

a felled tree has become a trough,

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and photos have been selected as have words. Next steps? Put all the pieces together and then you can see the whole for yourself, along with the work of six other fine artists at Peace: Cutting Through Turmoil, June 8 – July 1, 2017 at Brickbottom Gallery in Somerville. Stay tuned for further updates.

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As some of you know, I’m rather old-fashioned and so in this age of digital everything, I’m determined to engender in my youngest friends and family at least a modicum of respect for that ancient art of letter writing, even if the only “letter” written is a smiley face on the back of a postcard. Years ago I started an informal postcard club with a small group of children and though they now know far more than I probably ever will about virtual worlds and zombies and apps and emojis, according to their parents and guardians, they are quite pleased to receive mail. I’ve been slack in my duties of late but I decided one way to bring some peace into these chaotic times is for me to sit down and put pen to paper myself and send out some notes to my little friends … and always with the encouragement that they write back. Which some have done. ūüėČ This particular postcard I designed as a bit tongue in cheek using artwork from an 1886 stained glass window. You can find this card and others in my online shop.

 

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I first met Lois Fiore as a fellow participant in an art show curated by the Riverside Arts Group. It was a pleasure meeting her and learning of this artist whose work has been shown in the Boston area for over 30 years. Not only was she engaging in talking about her artistic process, she expressed genuine interest in learning about me as a person. When I shared with her that, in addition to photography, I also write and on occasion combine words with images, she invited me to share my work. I shared a post about the unexpected impact of meandering through the Boston Public Library and randomly opening up a book.

It was a compilation of slave narratives from the 1930s. Excerpts had been placed in various categories one of which included childhood memories of food. After reading “mussel ’em, a work in progress,” Lois invited me to submit a proposal to be part of a new exhibit, an exhibit inspired by the recent Presidential election and the subsequent struggle by so many to perceive how they could possibly move forward through the ensuing chaos. The proposal was accepted for my first interactive installation. ¬†I am truly looking forward to showing my work with the other artists in the exhibit PEACE: Cutting Through TURMOIL, on view June 8 – July 1 at the Brick Bottom Artist Building.

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If you’re in the area, I hope you’ll be able to drop by the opening reception or visit the gallery¬†at another time. Meanwhile, I continue to work on the installation. More updates in the near future!

 

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Madonna of the Harpies TCB

The original Madonna of the Harpies (1517) currently resides in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy. It was painted by Andrea del Sarto (1486 – 1530) during the High Renaissance. This likely 19th century reproduction, artist unknown, resides in the hallway of a local church. Like similar paintings I’ve found in churches as I photograph their stained glass windows, the history of their paintings, tucked oftentimes in out of the way places, has faded over time. The how and the why of their existence is hard to discern without deeper research. And then in the end, as I have been reminded, one must keep in mind that during the late 19th century as wealthy Americans made grand tours of Italy there was a great demand for reproductions of Renaissance art (assuming one couldn’t buy the art outright).

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Andrea del Sarto self-portrait

Andrea del Sarto was a contemporary of Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo and Raphael. This painting is considered to be one of his finest works. Much has been written about this painting. I especially enjoyed reading David Franklin’s description of the artist’s creative process on page 136 of his book¬†Painting in Renaissance Florence, 1500-1550. ¬†I don’t know that I shall ever make it to Florence but it was a treat to learn of this powerful work of art by walking down a hallway.

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Madonna of the Harpies by Andrea del Sarto (1517)

Sources & Additional Reading

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna_of_the_Harpies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrea_del_Sarto

http://www.uffizi.com/painting-madonna-delle-arpie-uffizi-gallery.aspx

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ResurrectionbyLaFarge1902

I’ve been lucky enough to have traveled to quite a few churches around the world, to glimpse just a bit of their sacred and secular beauty, and I have to say at this moment in my life, John La Farge’s The Resurrection (1902) for Trinity Church in the City of Boston is one that moves me most. It has been a pleasure to work collaboratively with colleagues there and with design companies to identify ways to translate, if only in a tiny way, such beauty in stained glass to items that people might like to take home or share with others.

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I still love producing postcards and prints but I think this translation of the image onto a collectible oval glass ornament¬†is especially striking given La Farge’s mastery of designing with the interplay of layered glass, paint and the effect of light always in mind. When you’re in the area, please see the window for yourself by visiting the church. ¬†Learn more here: http://trinitychurchboston.org/visit/tours. ¬†The oval ornament can be found in the church gift shop.

 

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CynthiaPattern

It was a rainy day which was okay because I think we need the rain. So I stayed inside dealing with necessary paperwork and wonderfully unnecessary research and in between I continued to play around with online tools like GIMP. I’m notorious for asking friends, especially when they’re grumpy, what brought you joy today? Several things brought me joy today, including dabbling in virtual paint to produce these patterns. ¬†I hope you had a good day.

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I have read too many headlines this morning. My head is full of thoughts. I think I shall take a break from the computer screen until I can sort them. Meanwhile, I share these last images from my recent visit to the Boston Public Library’s Abbey Room and painter Edwin Austin Abbey’s expression of Tennyson’s Idylls of the King.

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Panel XIII. Sir Galahad crosses the sea in Solomon’s Ship

As for what’s happening in this scene, from the BPL website: “Sir Galahad crosses the seas to Sarras in Solomon’s Ship, guided by the Grail borne by an angel. Sir Bors and Sir Percival accompany him, while three spindles for the Tree of Life rest upon the stern of the ship.”

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/sets/72157647672175522/with/15074561737/

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