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Posts Tagged ‘stained glass’

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Detail from stained glass window by Margaret Redmond (1867-1948). Located at Trinity Church in the City of Boston and dedicated to her friend and fellow painter Susan Hinckley Bradley (1851-1929). You can read more about Redmond and Bradley here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Redmond

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Hinckley_Bradley

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blueandgreen

 

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pastel window trim

I’m not sure I quite get Pantone’s “living coral” as Color of the Year but it did engage my brain … like the visual equivalent of a writing prompt … to seek out where that color might already be around me. I haven’t found it (yet) but I did chance upon a photo of decorative glass composed of other lovely pastel shades. And as I stared at that photo I began to imagine what might happen if I continue this new year with my interpretation and expression of John La Farge’s idea of “construction by color.” As you can see in the following slide show, you never know what might happen when you take colors, turn them on their sides, weave them together, shrink and repeat them … and so on and so forth until glass is translated into fabric.

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The scarf, 36 x 36, will soon be available exclusively at the shop at Trinity Church. You can follow the shop facebook page and instagram account to stay on top of this and other items I’m honored to have appear on the shelves.

 

 

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A new scarf designed for the shop at Trinity Church in Boston. It is 36 x 36 making it versatile as do the variety of bright, bold colors. It dresses up the simplest outfit. Coming January 2019. Inspired by the stained glass designer John La Farge.

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You’ll find this original design at the Welcome Center gift shop at Trinity Church in the City of Boston. The source of inspiration is the decorative detail found around the window Purity designed by John La Farge. You can learn more about the shop here.

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Before I leaned over the stairwell to photograph the window, I asked the gentleman at the front desk to listen carefully. If he heard a thud, he should come running. Luckily there was no thud and I was able to photograph an interesting decorative detail from the window, Purity, by John La Farge.

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In the early 1900s, during a lecture to young architecture students, John La Farge made the point that “The use of color in architectural decoration is not mere arrangement of pleasing tints. It is a matter of construction by color.” His philosophy is evidenced throughout Trinity Church. The rich colors and bold patterns he produced provide great inspiration for new custom merchandise from the simplicity of a square coaster to so much more including a green bordered 36 x 36 chiffon scarf, canvas pencil pouch and fountain pen. You’ll be able to find these items on the shelves of the shop at Trinity Church starting in January. Below is a slideshow of how a new pattern evolved from its original source. Hope you enjoy!

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Like his big brother Phillips Brooks in Boston, the Reverend Frederick Brooks was making a name for himself inside and outside of the pulpit doing good works in Cleveland, Ohio.  In 1874 he returned to the Boston area to find a teacher for a school that he had founded. In the course of his travels, on a stormy night on September 15, he left a disabled train in East Cambridge and decided to walk along the bridge. As his father recounted, “The night being dark, he fell through the draw and was drowned. He was thirty-two years of age. The body was not found until the 20th in the Charles River. Funeral services were held September 24 …” In Cleveland, Frederick Brooks had served as rector of St. Paul’s, a prominent church.  And that may be why Trinity Church vestryman Charles J. Morrill. if he had a hand in the selection of theme, chose to honor the memory of Frederick Brooks by funding a memorial window depicting Three Scenes in St. Paul’s Life. The window is located on the northern wall of the nave, designed by Henry Holiday of London, 1878.

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The story begins with a young Saul sitting with his teacher Gamaliel.

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The center picture represents Saul’s conversion to Christianity.

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The final image is of Saul, now Saint Paul, preaching to the people of Athens. As a whole the window is almost overwhelming … which makes sense given that it tries to capture one of the most complicated life stories in “just” three scenes. What is it I always say? See for yourself when you have the opportunity.

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https://trinitychurchboston.org/visit/tours

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