Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘walking’

Read Full Post »

By on the road, I mean walking around my Somerville neighborhood.  Still chilly, but felt good to be out of the house and seeing what spring has to offer.

mystic3

 

 

Read Full Post »

One day I found myself walking along, looking at the world around me.  I passed a stand of birch and I found myself thinking, if I only knew how to paint, I’d paint these trees.  I kept moving along, but the sight of the trees remained in my mind and I found myself thinking, if only I could write music then maybe I could write a song about the trees.  But I know I don’t write music and so I started thinking, if only I could sing then maybe I could find someone else to write the music, but that would only work if I wasn’t shy. Now, I don’t really think I can sing but sometimes when I’m sure I’m alone, some kind of sound passes between my lips.  And so that day, with all those if’s put out into the world, I decided to go ahead and try that singing thing.  The following soft words emerged in some kind of rhythm.

If I knew how to paint

I’d paint these trees

How the wind does make them sway

Their leaves sunlit

Their branches bent

While high above soars a bird

Nothing Earth-shattering but it did make me feel good to sing and then hum the song for a bit.  Only later did I realize that the tune (if that’s the right word) that I used for my trees was for that of Amazing Grace, a point made clear when I viewed one of today’s Cowbird Daily stories.  The video short is an excerpt from the journey of another walker, Andrew Forsthoefel.  I hope you have a chance to view and listen to the video for yourself.  And by the way, that picture above … there must have been a day when I forgot that I couldn’t paint. 😉

Amazing Grace

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

p.s. A few folks have asked where this flower shop is located.  You can learn more here.

Read Full Post »

After eating all of that bread mentioned in the previous post, let alone all of the other holiday goodies, a walk was necessary.  We chose a favorite spot, Revere Beach.  No snow upon the ground, but it was cold as evidenced by the water frozen in shells upon the shore.  A bright sun illuminated everything even if it did not warm.

Read Full Post »

Thanks to friends and family from around the world, I’ve got quite a growing collection of shells. Most of the shells that I have collected myself I have done so along Revere Beach in Revere, MA.  That beach has become a favorite haunt to walk for relaxation and exercise.  I never know what I might find in the sand and along the water’s edge.  Moving forward, I hope to venture further afield into the heart of the culturally rich and diverse community.  That is in part why I love and support the idea of a Revere Walking Map being created.  I do use them. Watch the video below to understand the behind the scenes making of such a map and/or visit this page to see the opportunities and levels for giving.  A great cause especially if you live or travel out this way.

P.S. Here’s how I’ve used a similar walking map to help make my way around Somerville and its parks.

Read Full Post »

This is a limited edition book created for a few folk who made our recent stay in Dublin, Ireland so lovely.  It can take a lot of energy to welcome strangers into your home and treat them like family, which is exactly what one couple did.  And it can take a lot of energy to welcome visitors from around the world to your home country and make sure those visitors experience a sense of place, which is exactly what conference organizers managed to do.  Once they have books in hands, I hope they enjoy the images that could not have been compiled without their generosity, good-spirits and great walking maps.  Thank you. 😉

Read Full Post »

Today I made my annual donation to one of the nonprofits I support, WalkBoston.  As a card carrying pedestrian (and dreamer), believe me, I need help crossing the road.  I made the donation in memory of my Aunt Thelma who used to describe her walks to me.  Following is a blog post I wrote about her two years ago, about how she influenced who I am today, including how I can choose to give myself to others.  This bright, beautiful day is her birthday so it seems like a good time to give back, and give thanks for her having been in the world.  At the end of the post is a youtube video of Dives and Lazarus by composer Ralph Vaughn Williams.  It was music Steve had shared with me, and music I remember replaying until I could collect the words to write about a lovely woman who in her own unique way helped me learn to walk in this world.  Please enjoy the words and the music, and have a good day.

***

Memories

My mother taught me to cook, to plant flowers, and to tell stories.  From her I learned to love books and to love writing.  She passed away before I ever wrote and had published my first story.  During her life, I never traveled abroad.  She never knew me with a camera in my hand.  She never met Steve or any other fellow in my life.  But her sister, my Aunt Thelma did.

In Aunt Thelma’s bedroom dresser are the postcards I sent to her from my travels all over the world.  On her bookshelves are the magazines and other clippings of my work.  And, last year, after I returned from my travels with Steve in Japan, she made me create a photo book for her.  “I need tangibles I can hold in my hand,” she said when I pointed out the pictures were viewable online.  “And include a picture of that fellow you’re seeing.  I don’t know if I’ll ever see him any other way.”  They never did meet, but she read about him, and they spoke on the phone once.  I sat next to her on her couch as she laughed with him on my cell phone.  I remember him asking her what he should call her.  She laughed and said, “Well, why you don’t call me what everyone calls me.  Aunt Thelma.”  After she hung up, she asked me if he was a good man.  I said yes.  And then we went on to talk about my brothers and their families.

Growing up in Virginia, my mother made it clear early in my life if I was ever in trouble I could call my Aunt Thelma who was living in New York.  When my mother died, Aunt Thelma traveled to Virginia and was there with me and my brothers, along with the rest of the family.  When my father died unexpectedly a year and half later, she couldn’t make it, but I will always remember standing in a hospital waiting room on the phone with her crying and her saying over and over, “You go ahead and cry.  It’s alright to cry.”

In bad times but mostly good, I called her, especially after I got a cell phone.  I could call her randomly as I returned home from work.  She’d laugh at my stories and in the end, wind up telling me to be careful as I crossed the street.  She always ended her calls with, “I love you, Cynthia.”

My Aunt Thelma passed away this weekend.  I will miss her.  I am thankful that she was in my life.  I learned a lot.  In NY this weekend, as the family gathered, I held one of my young cousins in my arms.  She was crying.  “I’m sorry,” she said as she tried to wipe her face.  I said, “Why are you apologizing? For crying? Don’t ever apologize for crying.  It’s alright to cry.  Do you know who taught me that?” When she shook her head, I said, “Aunt Thelma.”

Read Full Post »

Leaves found while walking along along The Causeway in Steventon, Oxfordshire. You can read more about The Causeway here: http://www.steventon.info/Causeway.html

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »