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Posts Tagged ‘churches’

A “found image” on my camera. Detail from a ceiling mural inside a church in Prague.

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You can read more about this personal project here: https://wordsandimagesbycynthia.com/2015/11/02/as-for-those-angels/

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It was a bit of a race against time.  A storm was rolling in. So though we knew we had a few hours before the sun was due to set we didn’t have that great a window of time for light. We raced, as fast as the trolley would take us and then putting foot to pavement, from the Mucha Foundation back to Prague Castle and the St. Vitus Cathedral.  Why? Because at the Mucha Foundation we’d seen a drawing of a stained glass window that Mucha had designed for the St. Vitus Cathedral but he had passed away before seeing it executed. But then while watching a brief foundation video on Mucha we learned that a company had funded the execution of the window and it was in the cathedral.  We made it back to the cathedral in time to purchase a ticket and track down the window. And what a sight it was.

And now there is a race against time to catch a flight home and so I will simply leave you with a few images and a few links. Read more about this amazing artist here: http://www.mucha.cz/index.phtml?S=biog&Lang=EN and http://www.muchafoundation.org/

More to share when I return to the States. Until then, be well.

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Yes, I have sought out stained glass in Prague and what beauty there is to be found like these images from the St. Vitus Cathedral at the Prague Castle.

Only a quick glimpse this trip …

… I hope to visit again for a longer period of time.  The windows were breathtaking as was the light they cast upon the stone.

Learn more about this cherished structure here: https://www.hrad.cz/en/prague-castle/guidepost-for-visitors/st-vitus-cathedral.shtml

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As the previous post suggests, yes, I am on the road for a bit beginning with a return to Dublin, Ireland! A quick trip for work and pleasure, and it was certainly a pleasure to chance upon the Saint Saviour’s Dominican Priory.  I had such a short window of time to photograph that I mostly focused my attention on a few windows. These are details from one window.

Here are details from a second.

Here is the third …

Little literature could I find at the time on the church’s architecture or artwork but the stories can be discerned from the glass.

I found the building by getting lost, but if you are seeking it out, it is located at 9-11 Upper Dorset Street, Dublin 1. Learn more about the priory via the following link: http://www.saintsavioursdublin.ie/

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Coming soon to the Book Shop at Trinity Church will be this postcard depicting The Sunday-School Windows designed and made by Clayton & Bell in 1874.

You can read an earlier post I wrote about these windows, a hidden gem, via this link: https://wordsandimagesbycynthia.com/2014/07/13/sunday-school-windows-at-trinity-church/

 

Additional Readings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clayton_and_Bell

http://printscharmingsoho.com/collections/clayton-bell-stained-glass-window-master-drawings

www.nytimes.com/2014/11/14/arts/design/conserving-stained-glass-records-at-corning-museum-.html

 

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Detail from Baptism Window

There are thirteen stained glass windows inside St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Central Square, Cambridge, MA. And I had the wonderful opportunity to stand before them all thanks to the kind gentleman, Rector Brocato, who let me through the door.

Detail from St. John the Baptist Window

Detail from St. John the Baptist Window

He took me on a brief and informative tour of his church and provided me with detailed literature.  The parish was founded in 1842. The current building was constructed in 1867.  The first stained glass window was added in 1917, designed by Wilbur Herbert Burnham.

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Wilbur Herbert Burnham designing a stained glass window, ca. 1940 / Paul Davis, photographer. Wilbur H. Burnham Studios records, circa 1904-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Burnham is one of two stained glass designers highlighted in the church’s guidebook.  He designed several windows for the church.

Detail from St. Anne Window designed by Burnham

Detail from St. Anne Window designed by Burnham

Detail from St. Anne

Detail from St. Anne Window

In the 1930s, two windows were added from the Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Studios, most noted of which may the High Altar Window.

Detail from High Altar Window, by Connick Studios

Detail from High Altar Window, by Connick Studios

High Altar Window by Connick Studios

High Altar Window

Detail from High Altar Window

Detail from High Altar Window

Detail from High Altar

Detail from High Altar

The current guide book is being revised to include the names of all the designers.

Detail from St. John Window

Detail from St. John Window

Even so, the current guide book provides a wonderful historical summary of the of the parish and detailed description of the biblical and secular symbolism in each window.

Detail from St. George Window

You can find out more about this welcoming place, from services and tours to community outreach, via the church website: http://www.saintpeterscambridge.org/

Detail from Nativity Window

Detail from Nativity Window

Sources/Additional Reading

Learn more about Wilbur Herbert Burnham in the Archives of American Art via this link.

Learn more about Charles J. Connick in the Archives of American Art via this link.

The Charles J. Connick Stained Glass Foundation is also a wonderful resource.

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At some point, I’ll set myself up in Copley Square with a tripod, and photograph the church’s whole West Porch.  At least I will do my best.  Meanwhile, I am having great fun photographing the porch details.

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… particularly at certain times of day is the altar inside Trinity Church in Copley Square.  This altar is not part of the original construction and furnishings that took place between 1872-1877.  As described in a 1952 publication, The Story of Trinity Church in the City of Boston, by Rev. Edward Dutcher Romig, it was designed by Charles D. Maginnis as part of a 20th Century redesign of the chancel.  He writes of a giant block of Montenelle marble quarried near Trieste, and covered with carved faces and inserted borders of Venetian gold glass and colored glass mosaics. “The peacocks on the face of the altar symbolize eternal life, and the grapevine represents the wine used at the Communion Service. Thus the whole composition tells us that Christians who devoutly partake of the Lord’s Supper share in Christ’s promise of eternal life.”

You can learn more in a variety ways including Art & Architecture tours.  Another excellent resource is the book The Makers of Trinity available at the Trinity Book Shop.

 

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… I just make myself sit in a place, for just a few moments, and watch where the sunlight falls. And sometimes I notice that there are places where I have to shine my own light into a shadowed nook to appease my curiosity.  One day recently, while shining such a light, this is what I saw at Trinity Church.

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