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Posts Tagged ‘arts’

As a child I made mud pies dusted with dry sand as if it were confectionery sugar, but sculpting sand into delicate forms?  Never learned that magic art.This particular sculpture, Imprinted, was one of several featured at this weekend’s Revere Beach Sand Sculpting Festival and was created by artist Sue McGrew from Tacoma, Washington.

 

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While on Newbury Street, I wasn’t far from one of my favorite haunts, the Boston Public Library.  I ventured there with the intent of perusing the new books and then taking a few more shots of the Sargent murals.  But instead of murals, I found myself photographing the bronze doors created for the library by Daniel Chester French.  According to the library website, there are three sets of bronze doors with each weighing 1500 pounds.  The allegorical figures, modeled in low relief, represent Music and Poetry, Knowledge and Wisdom and Truth and Romance.  I’m afraid I did not photograph Knowledge and Wisdom.  Maybe next time. 😉

You can learn more about Daniel Chester French on this Metropolitan Museum of Art page.

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It was the beauty of the artwork on the covers of fantasy and sci-fi novels that used to draw my attention in bookstores.   So many of the illustrations depicted a cloaked figure, partially illuminated.  And then there’s my growing interest in stained glass windows.  The figures in them, whether peasant or angel, wear luminous robes in a rainbow of colors.  With such inspirations in my life, how could I not see a cloaked figure as I zoomed in on this orchid?

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Next Sunday, in Cambridge, MA, the Riverside Gallery will be hosting its annual “50-100-150” Pop-Up Summer Show from 4:00-6:00 PM.  It is a juried show featuring 50 pieces of original art available for purchase at $100 each.  I am honored to have on display Gordon’s Poinsettia, a set of three prints, all images from a single poinsettia plant, and displayed in a custom 9 x 20 mat.  If you’re in the area that afternoon, I hope you’ll stop by.

 

Riverside Gallery
5 Callender Street
Cambridge 02139
www.facebook.com/RiversideGallery

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I’m excited to share that now available at The Book Shop at Trinity Church in Copley Square, this mug and two different magnets depicting a photograph I took of the stained glass window, David’s Charge to Solomon.  As described in an earlier post, the window was designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris.  The entire window is of course fantastic but for me, with camera in-hand, it is the light streaming through these angels that draws my eyes.  To see these items and other lovely merchandise, visit the Book Shop in the undercroft (basement) of the church, or you can contact the Shop by phone at 617.536.0944 extension 225.

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My first impressions of ancient Japanese warriors were formed by the Akira Kurosawa movies that used to air on Saturday mornings when I was a child.  Later, I read James Clavell’s Shogun.  That was a heavenly experience for someone who had yet to leave her hometown, let alone travel the world.  I haven’t seen the Tom Cruise movie, The Last Samurai, all the way through, though somehow I managed to buy the soundtrack.  All that to say, it was quite the treat to view the current Boston Museum of Fine Arts exhibit, Samurai!

Photo by DL

Photo by DL

As described on the MFA website, samurai were “the military elite led by the shoguns, or warlords, of Japan from the 12th through 19th centuries.”  Through August 4th, the MFA is featuring this exhibit of Samurai armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection that highlights how armor design and use evolved over time from actual warfare to more showcase.

Photo by DL

Photo by DL

I have to thank my friend, DL, for dragging me out the door to see this exquisite exhibit.  It was quite fascinating to see the layerings of cloth, metal and even paper that formed protective barriers for men (and horses!) — pieces that remain enduring works of great art. Afterwards DL and I wandered over to the Egyptian area but that’s a story for another day.  If you’re in Boston before August 4th, I hope you have a chance to visit.  There’s also fun stuff on the MFA website.

Photo by DL

Photo by DL

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Jen Parrish gave me permission to visit her online sites to select images to use as illustration for her interview responses.  As I did with other interviewees in 2012, I asked Jen to share how music inspires her artwork.  Viewing her artwork inspired me.   I had only to see an item described as “Gothic architecture meets nature” to know how appropos it was that she and I met through an art and architecture department in a Romanesque church.

She is an elegant, soft-spoken woman with a piercing gaze and gentle words.  It took me a while to learn that she is also a renowned jewelry designer whose handcrafted pieces are worn by celebrities and other people around the world.  Without ever having seen Jen work firsthand, I have only to listen as she speaks about her work to feel her dedication to beauty.  I expect everyone who purchases one of her unique pieces must know they carry part of Jen, and more than a bit of world history, with them.  I am very grateful she responded to my questions.   Please read her interview here.  I think you’ll find both the words and images quite interesting.

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Nine minutes.  That’s all the time I had to walk through the Church of the Convenant before the doors would be closed for the day.  Located in Boston’s Back Bay on Newbury Street, the church is famed for its interior design work and stained glass windows by Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company.  The opportunity to photograph just a bit of this interior arose the same wonderfully rainy day I had my photographic adventures in the Boston Public Library.

You can read more about Church of the Convenant’s architecture and artwork via this link.

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Ingres Serenades The Memory Of His Late Wife's Youth by Donald Langosy

Ingres Serenades The Memory Of His Late Wife’s Youth by Donald Langosy

Walking into the studio of artist Donald Langosy is like venturing into a secret garden soaked in light and shadow.  At first, all that one can do is gaze at the surrounding forest of color-filled canvases in all sizes.  Then the individual scenes emerge, often mysterious, sometimes dark and yet filled with light and motion at the same time.  By his subject matter, it is clear his passions for family, friends and for the artists across the disciplines who continue to inspire and influence his work.  The drama, the intensity and indeed the mischievous humor, come through each piece.  Last year I asked him how music influenced his work (view here).  This year I asked if he’d share an update on recent works.  Thankfully, he shared these images and the following words about what’s new, his creative process and where he finds goodness and beauty in this world.

***

Here are recent paintings as requested.  The Titania Paintings are from my Shakespeare series:  Midsummer Night’s Dream.  This is an ongoing series of 50″x42″ canvases that were actually painted end of last year.

Titania Sleeping by Donald Langosy

Titania Sleeping

I thought [the above painting of artist Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres serenading his young wife] would lead into a series showing artists with their model/muses and so I began …

Mr. and Mrs. William Blake in their Garden Reading Paradise Lost by Donald Langosy

Mr. and Mrs. William Blake in their Garden Reading Paradise Lost

“... but my intentions veered with …

John Milton Composing Paradise Lost by Donald Langosy

John Milton Composing Paradise Lost

… and now I find myself beginning two large canvases that will deal with thoughts that have emerged out of the garden of eden…

And as for Mr. Langosy’s muse, his wife, Elizabeth…

Celebrating Elizabeth Turns Fifty is a painting that has been buried in my stacks for over a decade…it now shines over my shoulder as I work… reminding me that while evil and ugliness might have its moment it is rejected and fades… but goodness and beauty, an eternal delight,  endures….

Celebrating Elizabeth Turns Fifty by Donald Langosy

Celebrating Elizabeth Turns Fifty by Donald Langosy

Learn more about this artist at his Facebook page, The Art of Donald Langosy.

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This scene is a detail from the Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris stained glass window, David’s Charge to Solomon, 1882.  The window, designed by Burne-Jones and executed by Morris, is located in the baptistry of Trinity Church in Copley Square. I was drawn to this particular section because of the colors, the incredible drapery of the cloth, and the faces of the women.

The faces of these women and apparently the faces of many of the women in Burne-Jones’s post-1860’s artwork all have a similar look.  They are likely the face of his great love and muse, Maria Zambaco.  She appears to have been the muse for many of the Pre-Raphaelite artists.  This wikipedia article gives a broad overview of the Burne-Jones/Zambaco relationship, but I must say that this Oxford Today article referencing Fiona MacCarthy gives a much richer picture of a complicated man, his many muses and the influence of his art.

Study by Burne-Jones, c. 1870

Study by Burne-Jones, c. 1870

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