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Posts Tagged ‘stationery’

Art by Maya

Art by Maya

Can you guess which one is me? A lovely gift from a young friend. A drawing of us out and about in the sun. She’s part of my informal Kids Postcard Club. My next step is to turn her artwork into a postcard and give her a few, along with postcard stamps, so she can share her work with friends and family near and far. We’ll see … 😉

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The image is from a stained glass window at St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague.  The interior is blank.  Click HERE for more information.  Other note cards, greeting cards and postcards of seasonal interest are below. Just click on the image. Enjoy. 😉

Peruse the whole store via the following link. An eclectic mix of items for sure capturing what I see as I meander in the world. http://www.zazzle.com/imagesbycynthia/products

 

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All three postcards depict beautiful fine art details found at historic Trinity Church in the City of Boston and are available in the church Book ShopPeace, Be Still is also available online via this link.

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… but I usually like to send them off with just a simple word or two like “Hi, how are you?” and conclude with a smiley face.  Okay, sometimes I say a bit more, like “remember to look at the sunset outside your window.” These are a few of the postcards available in my online shop.  You can view the full selection via this link:  ImagesbyCynthia Postcards

http://www.zazzle.com/imagesbycynthia

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My little friend, now 7-years old, visited recently.  She went to her corner, picked up some blank paper and her basket of crayons.  As she sat down to draw, she said, “I enjoy playing with paper.”  I could only reply, “So do I.”  This year I have been playing with paper in new ways.

Spending time perusing sites like the Library of Congress Prints and National Gallery of Art. Imagining how available imagery might appear on items from a stamp to a sticker to a paper plate.  It is a new creative outlet, producing products that I hope people enjoy for themselves or as gifts for others of all ages.

My image selections are influenced by the people and events around me.  In recent weeks I’ve found myself in conversation with cat lovers, musicians and folks who enjoy entertaining others.

 

The shop where these items can be found is called StationeryWorks because it began with my desire to dress up the letters that I was sending to friends and family.  It will continue to evolve. I hope you have a chance to check it out. 😉

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A few Christmas and holiday postcards and notecards available here and here and here.  You’ll notice a few colorful stamps as well. Enjoy. 😉

http://www.zazzle.com/imagesbycynthia

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New postcards available online via this link.  Simply sort by newest products. Happy writing, folks.

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I have an unofficial postcard club of 5, 6 and 7 year olds.  It is mostly a quarterly mailing of nature-themed images.  I have offered to hand the postcards to my young friends but they seem to like the idea of a handwritten note, a stamp applied, and the piece of paper traveling around the world (so to speak) before winding up in their mailbox, addressed to them specifically.  I have told the older ones that one day soon I expect a note in return.  😉

If you follow this blog, you know how much I love producing postcards of the stained glass windows at Trinity Church in Copley Square.  Of late, I’ve been focusing my attention on the painted walls.  Expect a future post about the original paintings orchestrated by John La Farge in the late 1800s and later painting done over the decades during various renovations.

This postcard is of St. Paul on the west porch of Trinity Church.  I especially love the reflection of the church in the glass of the neighboring John Hancock building.  This postcard is now available at the Shop at Trinity Church.

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In The Art and Thought of John La Farge, author Katie Kresser writes that John La Farge (1835-1910) completed his first sketch of Nicodemus and Christ in 1874.  That biblical encounter is a subject that La Farge would depict in several different forms over time.  Here is a sketch dated 1877 in the Yale University Art Gallery, and here is an oil painting completed in 1880, now housed at the Smithsonian.  He would also create a stained glass window for the Church of the Ascension in New York.  The following image, The Visit of Nicodemus to Christ, is a photograph of the mural La Farge painted on the walls of Trinity Church in Boston.

The Visit of Nicodemus to Christ, mural by John La Farge

The Visit of Nicodemus to Christ, mural by John La Farge, 1878

It is one of several murals that La Farge painted inside the building with the aid of assistants like Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Francis D. Millet and Francis Lathrop.  I keep photographing them because I think that there is always something new to see and experience.

In the literature of the time period critiquing his work, there is often reference to La Farge’s use of color in the murals that borders on the poetic.  For example, “In his “Christ and Nicodemus,” … we find the color quality strongly dominant. … the rich blues vein the draperies and background like the threads in a Flemish tapestry …” (The Churchman newspaper, July 6, 1901).

Christ Woman at Well, mural in Trinity Church by John La Farge

Christ Woman at Well, mural by John La Farge, 1877

The beauty of La Farge’s murals is constant but their colors do shift in the light.  Different details become present depending upon where one stands and at what time of day.

David, mural by John La Farge

David, mural by John La Farge, 1877

My favorite is perhaps the painting of David, because of the colors and especially for the expression on the young man’s face.

I had originally titled this post “in his own words” because I came across John La Farge: A Memoir and a Study compiled by Roy Cortissoz, literary and art critic for the New York Tribune, and La Farge’s friend.  In the book, completed in 1911 shortly after La Farge’s death in 1910, La Farge reminisces about what it was like painting the murals at Trinity under tight time constraints, in poor health, up high on scaffolding.  Reading the words made me appreciate the skills of all the artists even more.  If you’d like to read La Farge’ account, begin at the end of page 31 of the book, available online here.

Learn how you can see these murals and other architectural and design features at Trinity Church first hand here. Postcards of some of these images available via The Shop.

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It is always a treat to walk through Trinity Church in Boston’s Copley Square and to have the opportunity to photograph the architectural features, especially the stained glass windows.  This particular detail of a gold-winged angel is in the Edward Burne-Jones window, Wonder of the Shepherds (1882).  This image is now available as a postcard in the church Book Shop, located in the building undercroft.  You can read more about Burne-Jones’s adoration of angels in this 2006 article by his biographer, Fiona MacCarthy.  Learn more about the Book Shop here.

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